Can uterine polyps cause hyperplasia?

Can polyps cause thickened endometrial lining?

The exact reason that polyps form is unknown, but swings in hormone levels may be a factor. Estrogen, which plays a role in causing the endometrium to thicken each month, also appears to be linked to the growth of uterine polyps.

Is endometrial hyperplasia the same as endometrial polyp?

Normally, women naturally expel these endometrial cells during menstruation. In some women, however, the growth of cells becomes excessive, resulting either in flat or protruding growths, called endometrial polyps, or in a thickening of the endometrium, called endometrial hyperplasia.

What causes thick endometrial lining?

Endometrial hyperplasia most often is caused by excess estrogen without progesterone. If ovulation does not occur, progesterone is not made, and the lining is not shed. The endometrium may continue to grow in response to estrogen. The cells that make up the lining may crowd together and may become abnormal.

What happens if uterine polyps are not removed?

Uterine polyps, once removed, can recur. It’s possible that you might need to undergo treatment more than once if you experience recurring uterine polyps. If the polyps are found to contain precancerous or cancerous cells, hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) may become necessary.

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Do endometrial polyps need to be removed?

Polyps can cause problems with fertility but it sometimes depends on where it is placed on the cervix. As polyps can stop a woman from getting pregnant or cause a miscarriage, they should be removed if the woman is trying to conceive.

Should I worry about uterine polyps?

ANSWER: It is rare for uterine polyps to be cancerous. If they aren’t causing problems, monitoring the polyps over time is a reasonable approach. If you develop symptoms, such as abnormal bleeding, however, then the polyps should be removed and evaluated to confirm that there is no evidence of cancer.

Should I have a hysterectomy for endometrial hyperplasia?

If you have atypical endometrial hyperplasia, your specialist will probably recommend you have a hysterectomy. This is an operation to remove the womb. This is to prevent you developing a cancer of the lining of the womb.

Can uterine polyps fall out?

Small uterine polyps can go away on their own without treatment (2, 7). If they do become problematic, there are a few different options treating existing polyps, and for preventing their future formation.

Do uterine polyps cause weight gain?

So far, there is still no scientific evidence that proves uterine polyps can cause weight gain. But since it makes your lower abdomen swell, it can give the appearance that you’re getting fat. Hence the misconception that uterine polyps can cause women to gain weight. But, don’t worry.

How quickly can uterine polyps grow back?

After removal of a polyp, the patient can return to work in a few days. She may notice a little spotting for a few days. Only a small percent of polyps seem to come back, but it is possible that months or years after treatment a polyp might recur.

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What is the best treatment for endometrial hyperplasia?

The most common treatment is progestin. This can be taken in several forms, including pill, shot, vaginal cream, or intrauterine device. Atypical types of endometrial hyperplasia, especially complex, increase your risk of getting cancer. If you have these types, you might consider a hysterectomy.

How do you get rid of endometrial hyperplasia naturally?

Home remedies

  1. Heat. If your symptoms are acting up and you need relief, heat is one of the best home remedies you have at your disposal. …
  2. OTC anti-inflammatory drugs. …
  3. Castor oil. …
  4. Turmeric. …
  5. Choose anti-inflammatory foods. …
  6. Pelvic massages. …
  7. Ginger tea.

Are there any other symptoms of endometrial hyperplasia Besides bleeding?

Symptoms of endometrial hyperplasia include abnormal vaginal bleeding, including bleeding or spotting between menstrual periods, dramatic changes in the duration of menstrual periods, postmenopausal bleeding, or heavier menstrual blood flow. In some instances, endometrial hyperplasia may precede cancer of the uterus.